Those Lazy Yoots

I’ve seen several posts on Facebook bemoaning the low turnout of ‘Youths’ in today’s elections even though today’s voter numbers have been unprecedented. While it is easy to ascribe this to nonchalance on the side of the young people and a refusal to get involved in civic process, or as some people snidely put it – they’re on social media instead, making noise. The answers are not as simple as they seem. Continue reading →

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Cunny-Cunny Love.

It started with a friend request on Facebook.

It was one of his names that prompted her to click on the confirm button. It was the name of a love she had lost, buried in an unmarked grave in eastern Nigeria, it was the name of another love in the present, steady and crazy. It felt custom built mostly but sometimes it felt like living beside a dragon. It was also the name of a love that could be hers in the future if she dared, but she was a coward where her heart was concerned, and that might never change.

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Nearly Swindled.

Last Thursday, I noticed that my tablet’s screen was dead. It was on, I could hear the beeps from notifications but it refused to come on. I called the airtel number on it with my phone and it rang, in the dark. I was slightly worried but tried not to let it affect my evening even though I scouted the room for a place to charge it, even though I knew the battery was at more than 60%. Before we left for home that night, the light came on and that was that. Continue reading →

K-Legged Tourism.

“Chai I no even dey Lagos”

I was chatting with a friend who came into Lagos two days ago and wanted us to see and after tying ‘chai’ my phone predicted the rest of the message. I smiled as I realised how often I must have typed those words in that sequence. I have travelled every month this year- more than once in some months (May was epic) and all these trips have been within Nigeria- why am I not global now? Chissss *in Charles’s Okocha’s hypeman’s voice* Continue reading →

Betrayed

She sat with her left leg tucked under her body as she read a novel she bought from one of the young men who sold novels beside the Edegbe park at Yaba, they all knew her name and knew to save the latest titles by Marian Keyes, Sophie Kinsella and the Sheldons she hadn’t read yet. David Baldacci would be added to that list in the near future, but at the time she hadn’t seen Saving Faith in the hands of a certain Ekene. The year was still 2007 and she was in her second year at university. Continue reading →

We go dey Alright.

I grew up in the 1990s, in the heyday of Babangida and Abacha, when Nigeria rolled over and died. Because I was a child, I was insulated from the bleakness that hung in the air. While the terms SAP, DIFRI, Ogoni 9, attempted coup, annulled elections, PTF and military junta- I loved that phrase, were words I heard on the news, they had no real meaning to me until fuel scarcity joined the mix. Continue reading →